Sunday, May 20, 2018

Highly Linkable: Counter-Conventional Wisdom Edition

Trying to get back into the swing of blogging and just beating the 90-day hiatus limit . . .

Looking through my saved articles for future linking, I notice that just about all of them can be labeled "counter-conventional wisdom". Here are a few that, yes, have some age on them in the world of "that's so yesterday's Twitter", but I think they have value enough to be shared.

David Friedman, whose latest book is on my to read list, wrote about attending a Jewish wedding which got him thinking about what I would call modernity-biased myths about the past. I particularly like the Columbus myth.

You can't go very long discussing cryptocurrencies with a skeptic before they bring up the supposed Tulip Mania of 1600's Netherlands. But as I believe I've posted (or intended to) before, this is a myth. Hat tip to Tyler (of course).

I know I've posted before regarding our new puritanical age. I'm in good company with Matt Ridley who makes the case for today's "Millennials" being new Victorians. Yet again the young kids these days are not fitting their own (or the perennial young kids these days) stereotype.

This example of all common sources being wrong by Scott Sumner is a great example of a common view that unfortunately does not get scrutiny or challenge by the watchdogs or fact checkers.

Economics as a discipline itself needs more heresy (and reversals such that the heterodox becomes the orthodox). Arnold Kling, never shy to challenge along these lines, offers four contentions.

Sticking with Kling, he outlines five myths clouding health-care policy in the U.S.